Professional Beetle Smoocher
crazy-8:

tinycartridge:

New Ace Attorney 3DS game unveiled ⊟
According to this Famitsu scan posted by @Lite_Agent, this new game takes place during Japan’s Meiji period (1868 - 1912, a.k.a. Rurouni Kenshin times) and naturally features a new star — it looks like that star is an ancestor of Phoenix Wright. He has a sword, too. Cool sword, new guy.
The full title, according to @CourtRecords_, is Dai Gyakuten Saiban - Naruhodou Ryuunosuke no Bouken, or Grand Turnabout Trial - The Adventures of Naruhodou Ryuunosuke. As mentioned previously, Ace Attorney creator Shu Takumi is once again heading the project, after taking a break from the series with Dual Destinies.
BUY Ace Attorney games, upcoming releases

FUCKING WHAT?!

It’s not Apollo, but ok, Shu, I trust you. It’s not… DIRECTLY Phoenix…

crazy-8:

tinycartridge:

New Ace Attorney 3DS game unveiled ⊟

According to this Famitsu scan posted by @Lite_Agent, this new game takes place during Japan’s Meiji period (1868 - 1912, a.k.a. Rurouni Kenshin times) and naturally features a new star — it looks like that star is an ancestor of Phoenix Wright. He has a sword, too. Cool sword, new guy.

The full title, according to @CourtRecords_, is Dai Gyakuten Saiban - Naruhodou Ryuunosuke no Bouken, or Grand Turnabout Trial - The Adventures of Naruhodou Ryuunosuke. As mentioned previously, Ace Attorney creator Shu Takumi is once again heading the project, after taking a break from the series with Dual Destinies.

BUY Ace Attorney games, upcoming releases

FUCKING WHAT?!

It’s not Apollo, but ok, Shu, I trust you. It’s not… DIRECTLY Phoenix…

via-insectorum:

Bombyx mori,the Silkworm Moth

The silkworm moth is actually an example of a fully domesticated insect.  B. mori does not naturally occur in the wild and is completely dependent on humans for mating.  Sericulture (silk production) has existed in China for at least 5,000 years, and thus far we have yet to produce synthetic silks capable of rivaling the real thing.

Silkworms feed predominantly on mulberry, most specifically white mulberry (Morus alba).  The larvae feed voraciously, molting a total of four times, after which they will pupate in a cocoon of pure silk produced by their salivary glands.  If the pupa were left undisturbed, at the end of its pupal stage it would produce enzymes that bore a hole into the silk, allowing the adult to emerge.  The enzymes would reduce the silk length from nearly a mile down to a cluster loose strands, rendering the silk virtually useless.

Consequently, in the process of sericulture, the cocoon is often boiled, killing the pupa inside and making the silk easier to unravel.  After the silk is fully unraveled and stretched to be turned into fabrics, the insect inside is often consumed in various cuisines.

B. mori, the domesticated silkworm is very closely related to B. mandarina, a wild-occurring bombycid whence B. mori speciated.  The two, however, can still produce hybrid offspring.  Unlike its undomesticated counterpart, B. mori has lost the ability to fly in its adult stage.

By all accounts, the silkworm moth owes its speciation to human influence and has virtually no ecological impact due to its domestication.  It exists solely as a silk and food source.

All photos courtesy the Wikimedia Foundation.

screenhug is a really cute new blog run by a couple of cute dummos about long-distance friendships and relationships! I know a lot of you have long-distance stuff going on, so it might be cool to check them out!

If you don’t follow my twitter, I spent pretty much all of yesterday making and remaking a pair of grub earrings to wear once I get my ears pierced! My first, trial-and-error pair is still cute, but I am going to give them to my beloved shoona because she will be an excellent grubmother.
These are made entirely out of translucent and brown sculpey clay with some earring findings, and they’re coated in satin varnish for that kind of gooey look. I’m particularly proud of the veined abdomen- I worked particularly hard figuring out how to make them look right.
Overall I’m super excited to wear them- they’re sturdy (if a little big) and incredibly cute!!

If you don’t follow my twitter, I spent pretty much all of yesterday making and remaking a pair of grub earrings to wear once I get my ears pierced! My first, trial-and-error pair is still cute, but I am going to give them to my beloved shoona because she will be an excellent grubmother.

These are made entirely out of translucent and brown sculpey clay with some earring findings, and they’re coated in satin varnish for that kind of gooey look. I’m particularly proud of the veined abdomen- I worked particularly hard figuring out how to make them look right.

Overall I’m super excited to wear them- they’re sturdy (if a little big) and incredibly cute!!

metalslimer:

Me as Johnny Bravo
Man I’m pretty!

metalslimer:

Me as Johnny Bravo

Man I’m pretty!

jtotheizzoe:

Tripedal to the Metal
That’s some loco motion, huh? Found this neat little GIF showing how an ant’s legs move at a full gallop. While calmly strolling though the picnic grounds, ants have five of their six legs at a time in contact with the ground. But when it’s time to put the (tiny) pedal to the metal, they change their gait to this alternating tripod motion.
This pattern isn’t controlled by the insect’s brain, but rather by bundles of neurons in the leg called central pattern generators. While moving at such a clip, it just so happens that three legs is the minimum number it needs on the ground at a time to balance its rigid exoskeleton without toppling over.
Is that part of the reason that insects have six legs and not another number like four or eight? Or did the gait evolve to match the hardware? My guess is the latter, but I am not sure. What say you, insect folks? 
(GIF via NC State University)

jtotheizzoe:

Tripedal to the Metal

That’s some loco motion, huh? Found this neat little GIF showing how an ant’s legs move at a full gallop. While calmly strolling though the picnic grounds, ants have five of their six legs at a time in contact with the ground. But when it’s time to put the (tiny) pedal to the metal, they change their gait to this alternating tripod motion.

This pattern isn’t controlled by the insect’s brain, but rather by bundles of neurons in the leg called central pattern generators. While moving at such a clip, it just so happens that three legs is the minimum number it needs on the ground at a time to balance its rigid exoskeleton without toppling over.

Is that part of the reason that insects have six legs and not another number like four or eight? Or did the gait evolve to match the hardware? My guess is the latter, but I am not sure. What say you, insect folks? 

(GIF via NC State University)

buggirl:

christinahaberkern:

Missing my sister

Aw, I missed you too.

buggirl:

christinahaberkern:

Missing my sister

Aw, I missed you too.